BLP Unveils Fall ’17 Release of Knowledge Guru

The Fall 2017 Release of Knowledge Guru makes life easier for game authors and provides new gameplay options for learners. We’ve added several new features to the Knowledge Guru platform based on customer requests and lessons learned implementing Knowledge Guru games as part of larger curriculums for our clients.

New Authoring Tools and System Admin Dashboard

We gave the Knowledge Guru authoring tool a new, modern look and feel. Creating and editing games is now easier than ever. Tracking player progress, and automatically sending reports to managers who do not wish to log in to another tool, takes just a few clicks.

New Desktop Play Experience for Drive

We created our newest Knowledge Guru app, Drive, to be a mobile-first experience. But while mobile works great for many learners, some of us still want (or need) to complete training on a desktop or laptop. Now learners can play Drive on a computer, tablet, or smartphone.

Implementation Support, Anyone?

Everyone loves to talk about learning trends and technologies. But what about implementation? We’ve created a comprehensive collection of templates, tactics, and tips to help Knowledge Guru customers make their games a success.

Automatic Emails that Motivate and Engage

Knowledge Guru administrators can now choose to turn on a carefully crafted series of emails that players trigger with various in-game activities. These auto emails are designed to foster repeat play and gently nudge inactive users.

About Bottom-Line Performance

The Bottom-Line Performance team launched the Knowledge Guru in 2012. We are an award-winning learning design firm serving a wide range of corporate clients. Since 1995, we’ve helped clients choose the right learning solutions for their learners, while also helping them to design and develop learning tools effectively. Areas of focus include product launches, customer training, internal process training, safety & compliance and more.

We often use Knowledge Guru games as a pre-work or reinforcement activity in the custom curriculums we create.

BLP Adds ‘Drive’ Adaptive Learning App to the Knowledge Guru Platform

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BLP customers and Knowledge Guru subscribers got the big scoop last week on our Fall 2016 release of Knowledge Guru. But now, it’s time to tell the world: we’ve just added a new app called Drive to the Knowledge Guru platform.

Remind me again: what is Knowledge Guru?

We’re glad we asked. Knowledge Guru is a platform of apps that use game-based learning, adaptive learning and microlearning to increase knowledge retention and improve performance. Learning science built into the platform helps learners say and do the right thing at the right time, in situations when remembering really matters.

We use Knowledge Guru to add engaging training experiences and effective reinforcement into the curriculums we create for our clients in a fast, cost-effective way. We also have a growing base of subscribers who have internal training teams that use Knowledge Guru for a variety of training needs.

Our new video has a full description of the platform:

 

Ok, got it. Now, what about Drive?

Knowledge Guru Drive is a training reinforcement tool for sales reps, and it will be added to our Knowledge Guru customers’ existing subscriptions. We’re already piloting Drive with some of our custom services clients.

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Built for Sales Reps

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Many of our Knowledge Guru customers use the platform to train sales reps. Drive is for them: it includes a variety of minigames specifically designed to teach topics like comparing against competitors, objection handling, features and benefits, and responding to customer questions.

Adaptive Learning

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Sales reps take a short confidence assessment the first time they open Drive. As they play minigames, Drive compares reps’ perceived confidence against their actual performance on your training topics and customizes their experience accordingly to help them achieve mastery.

Microlearning

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Knowledge Guru Drive was designed with busy sales reps in mind. The app delivers reps a “Daily 3” of minigames that take about five minutes to play. If they have more time, they can hone their skills in the practice area.

Engaging Minigames

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Drive’s minigames are simple, elegant and fun. Clients who have piloted Drive have commented that “even our kids would think this is cool.” That’s high praise, and we’ll take it.

Mobile-first Experience

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Drive is available as a smartphone app in the iOS and Android stores. While reps can play it on the web on most devices, it was designed from the ground up as a smartphone experience.

Personal Stats

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Drive is like a fitness tracker for training content. As reps progress, they get detailed personal stats on their perceived confidence versus their actual performance on each learning objective.

Simple Creation and Editing

Like all Knowledge Guru apps, Drive comes with a game creation wizard that is easy to use. Trainers can quickly create, edit and launch Drive experiences with our web-based authoring tool.

Access the Launch Webinar

We officially launched Drive at DevLearn 2016 in Las Vegas on November 16. If you couldn’t make it to DevLearn, you can still watch the Drive launch session via webinar. We held a public session on Tuesday, December 6th and the recording is now available for all.

If you’re already a BLP client or Knowledge Guru customer, check your inbox. We sent you an invite to a private webinar just for clients.

How to Ace Learning Technology Implementation

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You’re ready to take the leap. The new XYZ learning technology is going to “Wow” your learners and you carefully aligned it with business outcomes. Your pilot group responded well to the new technology and it’s time to launch it company-wide. You know that the learning content is instructionally sound and employees will probably even enjoy themselves a bit once they give the new program a chance.

Still, you can’t shake the fear in your gut. What if this all goes wrong? What if it turns out to be a colossal waste of money? What if it all blows up in your face?

Design and Technology is Just the Beginning

We work with organizations all the time who are rolling a new learning technology. Whether it’s a custom app we developed as part of a blended learning curriculum or a series of games created with our Knowledge Guru platform, it is often our job to help our clients evangelize a new approach to learning within their organizations. Change isn’t easy for any of us. For large companies, it can be like trying to make a sharp left turn with an ocean liner.

What sets successful learning technology implementations apart from the rest is usually not the new technology itself, though that should obviously be good and suitable for the target learner. The real difference-maker is implementation.

Seven lessons from Successful Organizations

In a webinar we gave through Training Magazine Network, we discussed the approaches four different organizations used when introducing a serious game to their learners. These organizations come from three very different industries (technology, health care and financial services) and the initiatives targeted very different functional areas (sales reps versus call center reps versus HR associates), yet their approaches to implementation were remarkably similar. Some of these organizations even won awards for their approaches.

I looked for the commonalities shared between these four case studies and turned them into seven implementation tips that I think apply to many different learning technology implementations.

If You Build It, Will They Come?

Since the four case studies I looked at all dealt with a serious game implementation, I made that the specific focus of the webinar and corresponding white paper. The session is called Serious Games + Smart Implementation = Win! and the white paper is called 7 Steps to a Successful Serious Game or Gamification Implementation.

And while some of the content is specific to serious games, such as the adoption rate of organizations currently using games for learning and their plans for using internal vs external resources, most of my suggestions are fairly universal. Here are just a few:

1. Require it (at least at first): If you are rolling out a brand new learning technology, don’t just assume people will flock to it. Make it a part of the required training that people currently take. Requiring usage, even if just during an initial roll-out, ensures learners will at least give your new approach a chance. The organizations I have seen take this approach have had the most success with uptake.

2. Analyze it: Smart organizations use every opportunity they can get to assess the effectiveness of their learning technology implementations. Knowledge Guru customers use the analytics the platform provides, for example. Whether your new tool provides analytics or not, I highly recommend surveying learners after they have used it. You might be surprised at what you learn.

3. Promote it: This one may sound counter-intuitive after I just told you to require people to use your new learning technology, but promoting your initiative internally is critical. You have to think like a marketer and find ways to consistently encourage people to interact with your new tool or platform.

Get the Tips and Hear the Case Studies

You can view the recording from my Training Magazine webinar and download the white paper with implementation tips below.

Bottom-Line Performance Wins Three 2014 Brandon Hall Awards for its Knowledge Guru Platform

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Bottom-Line Performance won two Brandon Hall Excellence in Technology gold awards for its Knowledge Guru Game-Based Learning Platform. One gold award honored Knowledge Guru as Best Advance in Gaming or Simulation Technology. The other award, gold for Best Advance in Sales Training Online Application, recognized BLP and Cisco Systems, Inc. for Cisco’s use of the Knowledge Guru platform.

BLP and ExactTarget also won a bronze award for Best Use of Games and Simulations for Learning in the Brandon Hall Excellence in Learning awards earlier this year, bringing our total to three Brandon Hall Awards for the 2014.

The Knowledge Guru platform is used by Fortune 500 companies to reinforce and help employees retain critical knowledge such as policies, procedures, product knowledge and compliance information. The platform uses serious games that link engagement and motivation to the science of learning and remembering.

Cisco uses Knowledge Guru in its award-winning Cisco Sales Associate Training Program (CSAP) to train the next generation of sales leaders at Cisco. The platform helps new sales associates master and retain product and technical knowledge, and participants rate Knowledge Guru highly as a learning tool that helped them complete their Cisco certification. Cisco uses Knowledge Guru games around the world and the experience scores equally well in all regions – Europe, Middle East, India, China, Japan, Singapore, Australia, Canada, North and South America.

“It is truly a great honour for the Cisco Sales Associates Program to receive a second Brandon Hall Award,” said Paula Rossini, Global Program Manager of the CSAP program at Cisco. “The team is proud to uphold the highest standards in learning and to be recognised for this. We value our strong partnership with BLP and with them, we look forward to taking the learner experience to the next level!”

“I am honored by the recognition BLP’s Knowledge Guru platform has received in 2014,” said Sharon Boller, President and Chief Product Officer of Bottom-Line Performance. “It recognizes the efforts our team has put into designing and developing a research-based learning platform focused on helping people learn and remember critical knowledge and skills. It also recognizes the great work clients such as Cisco have done to integrate serious games into their organizations in a relevant, appropriate way.”

The entries were evaluated by a panel of veteran, independent senior industry experts, Brandon Hall Group Sr. Analysts and Executive Leadership based upon the following criteria: fit the need, design of the program, functionality, innovation, and overall measurable benefits.

ABOUT CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

Cisco (NASDAQ: CSCO) is the worldwide leader in IT that helps companies seize the opportunities of tomorrow by proving that amazing things can happen when you connect the previously unconnected.

ABOUT BOTTOM-LINE PERFORMANCE, INC

Bottom-Line Performance is a learning design firm serving a wide range of corporate, nonprofit, and government clients. Since 1995, we’ve helped clients choose the right learning solutions for their learners, while also helping them to design and develop learning tools effectively. Areas of specialization include product launches, customer training, customer service training, and safety and compliance training. BLP is a certified woman-owned business.

ABOUT KNOWLEDGE GURU

Bottom-Line Performance is the creator of Knowledge Guru, a game-based learning platform that uses learning science to increase employee knowledge retention and improve performance. Use it to create a single serious game teaching foundational knowledge or an extended play experience that incorporates performance challenges to help players acquire and practice new skills. The secret? Every game mechanic and game element are carefully linked to the science of how we learn and remember.

Bottom-Line Performance, ExactTarget Marketing Cloud Win Brandon Hall Award for “MobileConnect Guru”


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Bottom-Line Performance and the ExactTarget Marketing Cloud won a coveted Brandon Hall Group bronze award for excellence in the Best Use of Games and Simulations for Learning category. BLP and ExactTarget’s win was announced on September 10th, 2014. The winners are listed at http://go.brandonhall.com/past_award_winners.

The winning solution, MobileConnect Guru, was created using the Knowledge Guru Game-Based Learning Platform. Knowledge Guru is a cloud-based platform for designing serious games that link engagement and motivation to the science of learning and remembering.

ExactTarget’s employees, resellers and partners played the game to gain mastery over mobile terminology and product features and benefits – mastery that is critical to effectively selling and supporting a product. The game reinforced other rollout efforts and provided a “just before launch” reinforcement.

“We are continually looking at ways to innovate on our learning initiatives,” said Scott Thomas, Director of Product Enablement at ExactTarget. “The Knowledge Guru platform was a fun and new way for us to reinforce the training we needed to do with the launch of our new product. Our clients loved it, and the training led to meaningful business outcomes.”

“ExactTarget Marketing Cloud was truly innovative in the way they incorporated the Knowledge Guru platform into their training,” said Sharon Boller, President and Chief Product Officer at BLP. “They are a best-in-class example of how games can be integrated into a broader product launch training effort. We are proud of the award but more proud of the business results MobileConnect Guru helped drive for ExactTarget.”

The entries were evaluated by a panel of veteran, independent senior industry experts, Brandon Hall Group Sr. Analysts and Executive Leadership based upon the following criteria: fit the need, design of the program, functionality, innovation, and overall measureable benefits.

About the ExactTarget Marketing Cloud

The ExactTarget Marketing Cloud from salesforce.com (NYSE: CRM) is the leading 1:1 digital marketing platform, connecting companies with customers in entirely new ways. Learn more at www.ExactTarget.com.

About Bottom-Line Performance, Inc

Bottom-Line Performance is a learning design firm serving a wide range of corporate, nonprofit, and government clients. Since 1995, we’ve helped clients choose the right learning solutions for their learners, while also helping them to design and develop learning tools effectively. Areas of specialization include product launches, customer training, customer service training, and safety and compliance training. BLP is a certified woman-owned business.

About Knowledge Guru

Bottom-Line Performance is the creator of Knowledge Guru, a game-based learning platform that uses learning science to increase employee knowledge retention and improve performance. Use it to create a single serious game teaching foundational knowledge or an extended play experience that incorporates performance challenges to help players acquire and practice new skills. The secret? Every game mechanic and game element is carefully linked to the science of how we learn and remember.

What Will Corporate Learners Remember from your Training?

This is an excerpt from our white paper, When Remembering Really Matters: Learning Strategies for Long-Term Retention. The white paper includes eight strategies to improve learning and remembering. Here is Part 1:

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How confident are you that learners really remember what they learn from training delivered in your organization? When a week or a month has passed, how much of what they learned can they recall?

Some of you may respond by replying, “That’s not my priority,” which may be true. Sometimes the goal of training is not about changing learners’ knowledge or skill. Instead the goal is to verify that learners completed the training. Your organization needs to provide organizational proof of compliance or proof that they communicated information. In these instances, you may equate course completion with “ef- fective training.” The question of whether your learners will actually remember the content covered in the training a week or a month afterward is never asked.

THE COST OF NOT REMEMBERING

moneystackBut what about times when remembering REALLY matters? Organizations typically have business challenges to address and growth goals to reach. Leaders frequently identify training as a required el- ement for meeting these challenges or driving growth, and organizations spend billions of dollars cre- ating and delivering these solutions. ASTD estimates that in 2012 organizations spent approximately 164.2 billion on employee training.

Is that money well spent, or is it wasted? Imagine that you are in charge of designing and imple- menting a learning solution that addresses one of the business problems on the next page. What would your solution look like?*

moneybagEmployee turnover in a pivotal role is over 20%; the goal is 10%

A thorough performance analysis pinpoints lack of skill and experience as one of the drivers of the unac- ceptably high turnover. How much money do you save the company if you can design mem- orable training…and how much do you cost the company if you design training that doesn’t work? (Answer: millions of dollars)

peopleiconA home dialysis equipment manufacturer recognizes revenue growth is stifled by three issues:

1) Patients select home therapy, complete the expensive train- ing for it, but opt out of the home therapy after only a few weeks. 2) The time to train a single patient takes too long. 3) Centers can only train one patient at a time on the therapy, which means only .65 patients per month get trained. They want to reduce the patient drop rate, cap the length of the training at four weeks, and double the number of patients trained in a month’s time. How do you redesign it to produce the required business result?

timeA company wants to roll out a brand new product in a brand new sector.

The sales and support teams are completely unfamiliar with the product offering, and the sector is new to them as well. To make things even more challenging, these teams support products across nine different product lines with new product releases rolling out approxi- mately every two months. How in the world do you get them to remember THIS product? What sales revenue is lost if you cannot produce training that is memorable to members of the sales and support teams?

hospitalHospital labs spend well into six figures to acquire lab equipment your company sells.

Your agreement specifies that you provide them with a customer support specialist until they achieve competency in its use. Each week that your customer support tech spends in a lab is a week the tech isn’t available to assist with a new installation. You don’t want to hire more techs; you want to reduce the time each tech needs to spend with a customer AND you want your customers’ ramp-up time to be reduced. How do you redesign the training to achieve these results? What’s the cost of trainees not remembering here?

phoneSomeone has a heart attack on your corporate campus and passes out.

Because you have a large campus with more than a dozen different buildings, the safety pro- tocol is to dial an internal number to report an emergency rather than calling 911. What’s the cost here if those who witness the emergency do not remember what number to dial for help? This heart attack really happened at one of our client sites, and the individual who witnessed it DID know what to do because she had completed the safety training we created…and re- membered it. Would your employees remember yours? Would your training save a life?

When Remembering Really Matters – New White Paper from Sharon Boller

Sharon Boller, President of Bottom-Line Performance, has authored a new white paper: When Remembering Really Matters: Learning Strategies for Long-Term Retention. It’s full of research, case studies, and advice for learning professionals ready to reduce the amount of information learners forget from all types of training.

Here’s what is covered in the white paper:

What will learners remember?

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The question is not asked often enough in most organizations. Research shows us that most of what we learn is forgotten after a learning event, so what can we as learning professionals do to combat this in our designs?

The Cost of Not Remembering

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Managers, Directors, and VP’s are painfully aware of what happens when critical training concepts are forgotten. ASTD estimates that in 2012, organizations invested $164.2 billion in employee training. How much of your training investment goes to waste?

Remembering is hard; forgetting is easy

You’ve probably heard of Herman Ebbinghaus’ famous “Forgetting Curve,” based on research done in the late 19th century. While the curve can approach 90% in terms of total information forgotten, more recent research shows that the Forgetting Curve is highly variable. Regardless of the exact percentage, What percentage of what we learn do YOU think is okay to forget?

Four Strategies to Foster Long-Term Retention

Sharon introduces four proven strategies that inhibit forgetting and enhance remembering. You’ll learn more about how to apply these strategies, and the research behind them, in the white paper:

  1. Provide frequent, spaced intervals of learning instead of “glops” or “unrepeated waves.”
  2. Provide multiple repetitions.
  3. Provide immediate feedback for mistakes, and make sure learners get it right before moving forward.
  4. Use stories to drive the learning experience.

All of these strategies are explained in detail within the white paper.

Learning comes before remembering

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While the first part of the white paper focuses on remembering, part two is all about the learning. If employees never truly learn new knowledge or skill, they certainly will not remember it. Sharon introduces four strategies for learning that, coupled with the strategies for remembering, will lead to long-term retention.

  1. Balance the use of multimedia.
  2. Limit learner control in the course design.
  3. Personalize the experience as much as possible.
  4. Be ruthless in eliminating content.

Putting it all together

Perhaps most importantly of all, the white paper closes with a summary of five business challenges we solved for our clients using a combination of these strategies for learning and remembering.

Ready to change the way you design and deliver learning? Download the white paper now!

Are You Going to DevLearn 2013? We Are!

Looking to have your mind opened? Your paradigm challenged? Looking for a hot new tool you can start using right now to improve your corporate training?

There’s a conference for that.

DevLearn 2013

DevLearn is one of our favorite eLearning conferences, and it’s just around the bend… October 23 – 25 in Las Vegas. BLP will be at DevLearn in a big way this year. Members of the learning services team will attend for professional development… and we can’t wait to hear what they learn from the 200+ sessions available at the conference. Sharon Boller is partnering with Karl Kapp to lead a pre-conference workshop on learning game design, their fourth session of the year.

We’re ESPECIALLY pumped to send the Knowledge Guru team back to DevLearn with some exciting product enhancements to announce. We’ll be showing off the new business theme packs and improved Experience API dashboard, which makes it easy to connect Knowledge Guru to an LRS.

Are you going to DevLearn? If so, we’d love to meet and share ideas. Fill out this form to request a personal meeting with us, or come to one of the following sessions:

Powerful Learning Games You Can Build Yourself Happens Thursday October 24th, 12 – 12:45 pm on the eLearning Tools Learning Stage. Includes an overview of research supporting learning games… and an overview of Knowledge Guru. Learn more


Knowledge Guru in the DevLearn Expo See an overview of the Knowledge Guru game engine in Booth 208 of the Expo. Set up a free trial of Knowledge Guru. Happens all day October 23rd and 24th. 


Play to Learn: Designing Effective Learning Games Pre-conference Workshop happens all day October 22nd. Presented by Sharon Boller and Karl Kapp. Learn the basics of learning game design, then spend an afternoon prototyping your own learning game. Learn more


BLP at DevLearn Demofest See a demo of our Avoid the BBPs gamified eLearning course at Demofest. Happens October 24th, 4 – 6:30 pm.


You can register to attend the Expo, Learning Stages, and Demofest portions of DevLearn for free here.

Gamification, Sales Training in Learning Solutions Magazine

Gamification, Sales Force Training

Image © Learning Solutions Magazine

Organizations faced with fast product launch cycles must simultaneously train sales teams, support teams, and customers on the features and benefits. There’s often no “easy button,” however games and gamification are shown to be some of the most effective methods for acquiring new knowledge quickly.

Dr. Karl Kapp, Ed.D has written a two part series on games and gamification for Learning Solutions Magazine. The series focuses on case studies that show the efficacy of games and gamification in business situations. He gathered the case studies while researching his latest book, The Gamification of Learning and Instruction Fieldbook, which will be available soon.

Part two of Karl’s series is focused exclusively on product knowledge training for sales and support teams. The case study he uses is especially familiar to us: Karl describes how ExactTarget used our own Knowledge Guru game engine to get employees and partners up to speed on their MobileConnect product.

I suggest you read the full article, as it provides a comprehensive overview of how gamification principles can be applied to support a product launch and help people learn facts fast. The business results ExactTarget saw are particularly powerful:

The result for the business was that, of all the launches done in the two years previous to the MobileConnect launch, the sales team built one of the quickest pipelines for this product. The gamification approach improved product knowledge and helped the team build the sales pipeline while simultaneously reducing call-response times.

The hardest part about “selling” a learning game or gamification idea inside your organization is often just getting the initially buy-in. Thankfully, Karl’s upcoming book will feature many case studies, just like this one, to help making the case for a new gaming initiative easier.

So, read the full article to gather new ideas for implement games and gamification in your organization… and on how to use Knowledge Guru to make your own games.

Click the image below to read the full article.

The Gamification of Sales Force Training - Full Article

 

To Game or Not to Game? The Best Ways to Use Games for Learning

So, you think you want to use a game to help people learn. You’ve got the “what,” but do you know the “why” and the “how?”

There are many reasons to use games for learning… and also times when you’d be better off picking a different interactive learning experience. The best way to figure out whether or not to create a learning game, and to get the project started, is to ask the right questions. Karl Kapp has two short but sweet blog posts with questions you should ask before creating a learning game. Read part 1 here and part 2 here.

QUESTIONS TO ASK BEFORE YOU START DESIGNING

When mapping out a learning game design project, you need to determine the instructional objectives… and how the gameplay will serve those objectives. You’ll identify demonstrable tasks that can be completed through the game, and you’ll also decide whether or not a game can mimic the context where learners really need to apply the skills. I could go on, but Karl covers all of these in his posts.

Once you’ve decided that yes, you want to use a learning game, you have to decide whether it will be the primary learning activity or a reinforcement tool. This decision will influence the game’s content, design, and your internal promotion strategy. Yes… you should promote your game internally to get people to play.

Using a game as the Primary Learning Method

Games are most useful as the primary learning method when the content is highly immersive. Context is vital to learning, and a game that mimics the situation where learners will have to recall information or complete a task will aid in retention and performance.

We took this approach when creating A Paycheck Away, a board game that simulates the problem of systemic homelessness. Players play as a profile of a real homeless family and must make realistic decisions to try and get out of homelessness. While the game is a tabletop board game, the situations are realistic and spark real emotions. An issue like homelessness simply must be taught in an immersive experience like this that gives context to the problem. A quiz-style game teaching facts about homelessness simply wouldn’t cut it.

A Paycheck Away - Game as Primary Learning Method

A Paycheck Away game board

Conversely, a gameplay experience that is closely linked to how people learn best can also be useful as the primary learning method. Our Knowledge Guru® game engine is designed to utilized the principles of spaced learning, immediate feedback, and repetition to maximize retention of new information. When players play the quiz-style game as a primary learning method, they learn the information by getting questions wrong, reading the feedback explaining their misstep, and trying again.

Knowledge Guru game as primary learning method

Players learn from the immediate feedback in Knowledge Guru

Using a Game for Reinforcement

Games are also great for reinforcing the learning that happens through an eLearning course or instructor-led session. After people complete the regular training, you can simply send them the link to play a game or invite them to a face-to-face session. The key with using a game for reinforcement is to promote it well and remind players consistently that they should come back and play.

ExactTarget, a digital marketing company, used Knowledge Guru to help employees prepare for a product launch. Since they are a marketing company, they did exceptionally well at promoting the game internally, and saw a high rate of participation as a result.

Take a look at some of the emails and advertisements ExactTarget used to position their game as a reinforcement activitiy:

Internal Advertisement of Learning Games for Reinforcement

Example of a banner ad displayed to employees

Email messages that include a link to play the game are also very effective.Send internal emails to encourage game play for reinforcement

Games are Fun… Which Makes Participation Easier

“Fun” can be pretty intangible, so business types sometimes shy away from citing it as a goal for training. We’ve seen that the “fun” factor of games is a big motivator for getting players to come back and reinforce skills and knowledge. Even giving a basic game eye-catching graphics, a narrative, and a sense of purpose goes a long way.

We use a pre-game narrative to set the stage for Knowledge Guru games. The first page is pictured below with our soon-to-be released Business Theme Package.

Fun, story-driven nature of games can make people want to complete reinforcement

Whether you decide to use games as the primary learning method or as reinforcement, asking the right questions up-front and designing it with “fun” in mind will help set you up for success.